Posts Tagged ‘Muay Thai’

By: Jonathan M. King The Clinch Report

Photos By: John Walsh The Clinch Report and Bob Fisher Pugilpix.com

Thirty-seconds earlier, a confident Richard LeRoy awaited the opening bell in the biggest fight of his young career. During the introductions, LeRoy stared across the cage at his opponent before briefly acknowledging his fans. The moment for LeRoy had been a long time coming, and he seemed like he was ready for the challenge.

The thirty-seconds that immediately followed don’t exist for Leroy, because he has no memory of them. “Do you remember what happened?” LeRoy joked. His opponent that night Jalin Turner punched the time clock right on the pause button when he cracked LeRoy so hard and so often, the entire first 3 minutes turned into a blur. As LeRoy covered up on the ground, the thunderous shots echoed. He knew the referee was getting close to stopping the fight, and admittedly that was all he knew. Richard LeRoy still doesn’t remember what happened, but he sensed he was very close to losing everything he had worked so hard to regain. As all these thoughts ran through his head, and the referee approached all he could think was, “Im not fucking going out like this.”

Two years earlier, after a dramatic come from behind knockout win over Brandon Hastings, LeRoy began feeling discomfort in his right shoulder. Hastily he was initially diagnosed with an AC separation. Initially the arm was immobilized and a rehabilitation program would follow to facilitate the healing. Throughout his time off LeRoy kept training the best he could, using only his left arm. After the rehabilitation program was completed, the pain persisted. Following the advice of a friend with connections in the medical field, LeRoy was able to get an MRI which revealed a torn Labrum, an injury that would require immediate surgery and yet another extensive rehabilitation. While on the shelf, LeRoy watched as the promotion he called home crowned their first ever CXF lightweight champion. ” It is just a matter of time.” LeRoy thought to himself.

In a haze and in a heap, LeRoy somehow coherently realized he was about to lose everything he fought so hard to get back. It was that thought alone that inspired him to survive. A momentary reprieve in the assault by Turner would only make the next barrage seem that much more cruel. As again Turner sent LeRoy in search of level footing. Trying to find his equilibrium, LeRoy was rewarded with a nasty knee that again dropped him to the canvas.  Wobbling and in retreat for most of the round, LeRoy cleared the cobwebs and like a cornered dog he began snapping back. “Late in the round at one point, somehow I ended up in mount, and  that is when I really started to get my head clear.” LeRoy said. Finishing the round in top position, LeRoy appeared to have weathered the storm, but that was only the first round and the hell that greeted him 5 minutes earlier was again waiting for another encounter.

As the second round began, again Turner found success with his range, as he began to pepper LeRoy from angles the shorter fighter could only imagine. However this time LeRoy didn’t seem as effected as much as was in the previous round. Relentlessly he pressed forward and soon he began to break-down the range of Turner.  Finding some success on the inside, LeRoy began chopping down his longer opponent, but Turner obliged and kept the violent merry-go-round going. As the moments ticked by, the pendulum of momentum started to swing in LeRoy’s direction. “I remember dropping him with an inside leg kick, and I popped right into mount. I could see he was starting to get tired.” LeRoy said. Continuing his attack until the bell, a confident LeRoy went back to his corner thinking he had won the second. “I though for sure I won the round,” LeRoy said.

Drenched with sweat, referee Mike Beltran was long past exhausted and his normal jovial expression had hit the road sometime in the first round, in its place a stone like expression I’m glad to say I don’t know. The air was thick in the Burbank Marriott ballroom as the third round opened. Again the aggressor, LeRoy kept his foot on the gas. The more he pressed, the more his opponent began to slow. Late in the third round with Turner starting to fade, Leroy found himself in the top position. Sensing the end LeRoy looked to inspire the finish with some nasty ground and pound, punctuated effectively with elbows in between. The referee again came close, and after a few warnings from urging Turner to defend went unanswered the assault was stopped at 4:18 in the final round. Capping one of the best comebacks ever in the CXF cage.

The win earned LeRoy a spot in the semi final round for the CXF promotions ‘Cali Kings’ tournament. Putting him just one fight away from the title. However the epic war with Turner came at a cost, and due to injuries suffered in the fight LeRoy withdrew from the tournament. “I really wanted that title. When I was injured and I first saw the CXF belt I sort of already considered it mine,” LeRoy said with confidence.

After a three-month layoff that included a trip to Europe, LeRoy is back in the hunt for the CXF title. Standing across the cage this time in a lightweight title-eliminator will be the well-travelled and equally explosive Christian “The Beast” Aguilera. A well-rounded fighter  like LeRoy, Aguilera is an equal opportunity ass kicker. He can knock you into next week with one shot, or he can choke you to sleep. His dangerous skill set and hybrid pedigree is something LeRoy is well aware of; “Christian’s a tough dude, and he looked great in his last fight.” LeRoy said. “He is very good on his feet; a good striker, and he has great jiujitsu as well. The fight is going be a challenge for sure, but I will be ready.”

With the winner of the bout earning an immediate title shot at the conclusion of the ‘Cali Kings’ tournament, LeRoy once again finds himself just a few steps away from the title he coveted for so long.

CXF 10:Fall Brawl will take place November 4th, in Studio City, CA at the world-famous Sportsmen’s Lodge. For tickets go to: www.mmatixx.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

That epic

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“Preserve, within a wild sanctuary, an inaccessible valley of reveries.” -Glasgow

By: Jonathan King The Clinch Report

Photos By: John Walsh and Bob Fisher

Growing up on La Brea between Hollywood and Inglewood, Chase Gibson (4-2 MMA) wandered for much of his youth, pulled between the two worlds his parents separately inhabited. Somewhere in the middle, Gibson began a downward spiral, where he danced with many demons that would ruin most of his teenage years. The story seemed destined for a bad ending, when a mirror image opened a rather odd door to redemption.

That image was both literal and figurative. Cooper Gibson (6-2 MMA), Chase’s identical twin brother ended up finding a path that kept him out of trouble, and soon led him to gaining quite the name in the sport of mixed martial arts. “Cooper cleaned up his life before I did”, Gibson said. “Watching his success in the sport inspired me to start seriously training. “Not surprisingly, like his twin brother, Chase quickly took to the sport as a natural, but then old injuries and old demons came knocking again! “Early on in my training I had some previous injuries that came back, and I sort of used that as an excuse to start messing up again”, Gibson said. Quickly Gibson was able to right the ship, and as soon as the injuries subsided he was back on course.

The long road to redemption for Chase Gibson may have started somewhere near mid city, however oddly enough, he would finally satisfy that search locked in a cage. Facing some rather stiff competition, Gibson cruised through the amateur mixed martial arts ranks with a stellar 5-0 record. Undefeated as an amateur, Gibson made his pro debut and true to form he continued hs winning ways, finishing his opponent in the very first round by rear-naked choke. At this point Chase Gibson appeared to be on cruise control, but then the wheels fell off.

First a split decision loss to Andrew Natividad under the King of the Cage banner spoiled his undefeated streak, then a razor thin unanimous decision loss to Derion Chapman followed. Gibson quickly found himself on the wrong side of .500 for the first time in his career. “That was a tough place to be”, Gibson said. “Especially since I think I won both of those fights.” As unfamiliar as losing was, it certainly was not enough to let those demons back in. “It was a very rough time, but as rough as it was at no point in time did I say f&ck it! I just got back in the gym, and made some adjustments”.

One of those adjustments was learning how to cut weight properly. After the two losses, Gibson noticed a weakness in his game that he correlated to his weight cutting procedures. So he fixed the wheel. “I actually sought out people who do this for a living, and it turns out I was doing it all wrong” Gibson said. The results were obvious.

In his first bout under the CXF banner, Gibson needed only 1:05 seconds to lock up a Brabo choke over a very tough AJ Bryant. In his next bout Gibson picked up perhaps his most notorious win, when he knocked out Far Mohammed with a highlight reel head kick that quickly went viral on the internet. In his next bout Gibson outworked a very game Adam Calderon cruising to a unanimous decision victory.

The impressive win streak has earned Gibson a seat at perhaps the most prestigious table of his career. Standing across from him will be a very violent Serob Minasyan (6-8 MMA), between them the CXF Featherweight Title will await the winner. With so much at stake you can bet the CMMA team and Chase Gibson have been doing their homework. “He’s a tough strong wrestler”, Gibson said. “He has a decent shot, and he throws heavy, but I don’t think he has ever fought anyone like me.”

Even though a title hangs in the balance, for Gibson there is a lot more at stake than a shiny gold belt. Recently married, Gibson also found out he will soon be a father. “We found on my birthday.” Gibson said. With a child on the way, the win means more than any other before. And although it may add some anxiety, that uncertainty gets crushed by the motivation to feed his family.

For Chase Gibson, a win and a CXF title would certainly bring him some validation. “I think CXF is one of the best regional shows in the country by far, the challenges they put up are amazing, they have some great fighters here, and a win really means something.” However it would also go a long way to justify the faith this young man has put in himself.

Redemption can be quite elusive for the lost. Constantly searching to find yourself can often lead down a very dark path. The luckiest of us emerge in the light on the other side. Finding the path to the light is never guaranteed, and what works for some may not for others. For years Chase Gibson chased his redemption, only when he stopped running did he find it within.

By: Jonathan M. King The Clinch Report

Videoed And Edited By: Arin Ian Lights Out Promotions

Daniel Clark (3-2 MMA) Is one of Southern California’s most exciting young fighters, and he makes his return to the Lights Out Promotions and Bash Boxing Cage on July 10th at The Sportsmen’s Lodge in Studio City. Clark, a muay thai specialist returns to action after almost 8 months on the shelf due to nagging injuries.

Now fully healed, and with his edge as sharp as ever, Clark will be looking to make an example of the very well rounded Marlen Magee. Magee, currently in the midst of a 3 fight win streak, will be out to prove that he is nobodies stepping stone. The fight on paper could be an early candidate for Fight of The Night, so make sure you are in your seats early for this one!

For Tickets go to: http://www.valleyfightnight.com

 

By: Jonathan M. King The Clinch Report

Filmed By: Bob Fisher Pugilpix.com and John Walsh The Clinch Report

That city is well fortified which has a wall of men instead of brick.”  Greek Philosopher Lycurgus

Christos ‘The Spartan’ Giagos (9-2 MMA) has become one of the most complete mixed martial artists in southern California. He has notable wins over Sevak Magakian, Chris Tickle, the late great Joe Camacho, Thor Skancke and Preston Sharf. In his last fight, Giagos secured the Tachi Palace 155 lbs title against Magakian.

However the celebration with his father and friends was short lived. The win earned Giagos another title shot in a gateway bout with Dakota Cochrane for the RFA 155 lbs title on August 22nd. More importantly the winner will almost certainly punch his ticket into the UFC.

Preparing him for this bout as always is his Systems Training Center Family. Giagos trains alongside BAMMA USA 135 lbs Champion Terrion ‘Flash’ Ware, WSOF fighter John Robles, and recent RFA standout Dmitry Gerasimov. With coach Ian Harris and Marcus Kowal in his corner, Giagos rounds out a uniquely talented team.

Giagos sat down with The Clinch Report, to talk about his now infamous celebration after his Tachi Palace win, training for his RFA title fight, and what it means to be a major part of the Systems Training Center family.

Christo Giagos is Represented By: Iridium Sports

Giagos vs Cochrane for RFA 155lbs Title

 

 

By: Jonathan King The Clinch Report

Photos By: John Walsh The Clinch Report

You are a product of your environment. Where you come from has everything to do with who you are and who you become. The early stages, the developmental stage of life needs to be met with a family environment in order to thrive. For fighters this infintile juncture is also the most important. Often talent gets snuffed out before it has a chance to blossom because of confidence issues, gym egos, or lack of focus. Each fighters personality has to gel with the entire gym, otherwise cliques develop and factions arise.

At Systems, the team dynamic is the most important common theme. This is not a gym for individuals motivated by inflated egos.

The team concept is evident as soon as you enter the doors at Systems Training Center in Hawthorne, CA. During pro practice, the fighters children play nearby as daddies and mommies beat the holy hell out of each other. Although a cohesive unit, where everyone loves everyone, the old adage applies iron sharpens iron. With owner Marcus Kowal and coach Ian Harris leading the charge, Systems has several fighters on the verge of making it to the big show, and a few who are already fighting in big shows.

John Robles (7-3 MMA 0-1 WSOF) has already fought once for the World Series of Fighting, where he lost a decision to UFC veteran Jared Papazian. Robles is a hard punching striker, with a great chin and forward moving mentality. Now fully healed from a few nagging injuries, Robles is ready to finish the year strong, and looking to fight before the end of the summer.

Christos Giagos (9-2 MMA Tachi Palace 155 lbs Champion) is one of those guys that just looks like a fighter. He has wrestler build, but with a Leno-like chin. He utilizes a great combination of jujitsu and wrestling on the mat, to secure some pretty slick submissions. On his feet his power is evident. In his last fight, he defeated a very tough Sevak Magakian via triangle choke in the very first round;  securing his first major world title at Tachi Palace. Giagos is looking to possibly fight for the RFA title before the end of the year, but nothing a contract is not in place yet. One thing is certain though, the UFC is paying very close attention. Already on their radar, Giagos intends to stay ready to fight in case that phone rings.

Terrion Ware (11-2 MMA Bamma USA 135 lbs Champion) is another fighter who is playing the waiting game. Riding a 6 fight win streak, Ware has torn through the SoCal ranks, and is one of the top pro prospects in the state. Currently the Bamma USA bantamweight champion, Ware is also slated to fight for the Tachi Palace belt against former Bellator Champion Joe Soto. A win there would all but guarantee a trip to the UFC.

Systems has a very busy month ahead, with training camp in full swing for several fighters preparing for fights on the horizon. Each morning this family gathers, then they punch each other in the face, happily. After all “the family that kicks the crap out of each other stays together right”?

You can be sure that the waves they are making in the fight world will continue to grow. However, remaining true to their identity is the key to their success. As the future brings more and more success, you can be certain that family atmosphere will never change.

 

 

 

 

 

Sevak Magakian unable to walk, but still gets the win!

Sevak Magakian unable to walk, but still gets the win!

By:Jonathan King The Clinch Report
Photos By:John Walsh The Clinch Report

What makes a great mixed martial artist? If you were to create a sort of MMA ‘Frankenstein’ what characteristics would you start with? The myriad of skills that make up a fighter can be debated for ages, as to which is the most important. However, there is only one that cannot be taught: Determination.

There have been many instances where a fighter has simply refused to loose, despite injury or adversity. Team Hayastan fighter Sevak Magakian (13-4 MMA) is the latest artist to enter that pantheon of gritty, scrappers that make this sport such an enjoyment to watch.

Early in his fight with TUF Alumni Chris Saunders (10-6 MMA) at ‘Chaos in The Casino’ at Hollywood Park Casino, it became apparent that Magakian suffered a devastating leg injury. Later on the extent of the injury was revealed to be a dislocated ankle, and a broken leg! Not only was he able to finish the round, but with a double leg take down, and his counter strikes, Magakian was able to win the frame.

Once in his corner, a look of concern washed over everyone in the corner. Magakian told his coach Gokor Chivichyan the extent of his injury. However, quitting was not an option. So, into the second round he limped.

Once again Magakian was able to land the cleaner strikes, and again appeared to be building a clear advantage with points. Saunders who began attacking the injured leg, for some reason relented his assault, and ended up playing right into Magakian’s game plan.

Once the third round began, Saunders appeared to be in desperation mode, but a foot injury also hampered his efforts. Magakian was able to cruise to a unanimous decision victory, in a fight that will be remembered by all who watched as one of the most incredible displays of courage ever witnessed inside of a cage.

Unlike the cliche states, not every ‘win is a win’! In this case,  a win defines much more than a number in a column. In this case ‘the win’ represents the best in people. Magakian has a bright future ahead, one that will certainly place him on a larger stage, however this fight maybe the one that defines him best.

Lights Out Promotions also featured several Muay Thai and Boxing fights that evening as well, making it an all round combat sports card. Please check out the photo gallery bellow.

All images and content are the property of The Clinch Report, LLC registered with the state of Nevada.  Any unauthorized use of the images or content is expressly prohibited. Please contact us at news@theclinchreport.com for further information.

Jason Mayhem Miller, claims if this fight stays standing, that he will knock out Michael  Bisping. A bold claim considering Bisping  has the clear advantage in most experts eyes, as far as striking goes. However, Bisping would be wise to give respect to Miller’s improved Muay Thai striking.

Bisping’s punching power is well known, and is the primary reason for The Count’s  current three fight win streak.  However, he still has not been able to shake the specter of Dan Henderson’s right hand. The vicious knockout is still replayed often, and always mentioned in the same breathe when Bisping;s name is mentioned.  The stigma is unfair, especially in a sport that that see’s very few go undefeated.

Jason Miller is going to have to utilize his muay thai, to close the distance. Then he will look to bring the fight to the mat, where his superior jujitsu will give him a decisive advantage.  Bisping will have to keep his distance, utilizing his jab. His superior boxing skills, and knockout power will only be effective with space.

Prediction: Jason Miller via rd 3 submission.