Posts Tagged ‘Antonio Banuelos’

By: Jonathan M. King The Clinch Report

A long time ago, in a galaxy far away…actually it was San Luis Obispo… a young fighter living with Chuck Liddell and Antonio Banuelos was in search of a nickname. Fighting at a weight class that didn’t even exist yet, Ian McCall began his journey in Mixed Martial Arts at the tender age of 18, amongst giants with monikers like ‘The Iceman’ and ‘The Huntington Beach Bad Boy’.  Then one late night, while chasing around a friends son in an attempt to tire him out. A slip of the tongue from a child created one of the greatest nick names in the history of our sport. Randomly from the mouth of a babe, ‘Uncle Creepy’ was born.

Since then Ian McCall (13-5 MMA) has embarked on a life journey that has been a ‘creepy’ roller coaster ride of highs and lows, both emotionally and chemically. All the while, McCall has been able to maintain his status as one of the top 125lbs fighters on the planet. From his legendary thread on The UG, to his epic brawls with Demetrious Johnson; Ian McCall has always been a fan favorite.

“Everyone knows Im the lovable, degenerate, savior who can’t seem to get his shit together!” McCall said. “However, things changed, I had a kid and I can’t do those things anymore!” McCall said. Now the father of a young daughter, McCall seems to be adjusting well to the responsibility. However the troubles continued, almost like some sort of curse. Injuries mounted, multiple procedures were needed and then the bottom fell out. McCall and the rest of his Team Oyama family were devastated by the sudden death of friend and teammate Shane Del Rosario.  Having buried my best friend, I can attest to the affect it has, life in itself becomes difficult however life continues and so to does the career of ‘Uncle Creepy’

Now 5 weeks out of shoulder surgery McCall may not be ready for a fight but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have something to say.  After this weekends 125 lbs Title Fight, McCall was a guest on the Brutally Honest Radio Show where he talked about his life, his career, and more importantly when we can expect his return! Check out the interview to hear about his Legendary thread on the UG, the philosophy he used for picking up girls, why American MMA fans are ‘pretty fucking stupid’, and how he is the savior for the 125 lbs division!

Brutally Honest Radio is hosted by Aaron Tru, Adrian Gallegos, and Jonathan King. The podcast is broadcast live each week from an undisclosed studio in Long Beach California. You can subscribe and download each episode on iTunes. Or you can listen on sound cloud.

Advertisements

By: Jonathan M. King The Clinch Report

Video and Edited By: Bob Fisher Pugilpix.com

Photos By: John Walsh The Clinch Report
Chad ‘The Savage’ George has been around the mixed martial arts block a few times. He understands the game as well as anyone. He first burst into the rankings while fighting for the now defunct WEC (Which was purchased by ZUFFA in 2008 and later absorbed in 2010). While under the Zuffa umbrella, George earned his first win over John Hosman before losing to Scott Jorgensen, and Antonio Banuelos. The latter of the two bouts was a title eliminator bout, a fight George lost by a close decision.

Leading up to his last fight in the WEC, George was the subject of a documentary called “Occupation Fighter” which received a huge following on Netflix. The movie documented his training camp leading up to the bout with Banuelos. The movie brought a lot of attention to George, and it looked as though the UFC would be calling. Shortly after his last fight in the WEC, the UFC absorbed the promotion, however they only created one new division, leaving George and a host of others without a job.

Not one to wait, ‘The Savage’ returned to the regional scene and quickly picked up 3 wins in a row. Once again on the precipice, George stepped up to face current UFC contender Joe Soto under the Tachi Palace banner. George started out doing very well until he made a mistake and got caught in a choke that cost him the fight.

A subsequent loss to UFC bantamweight Cody Gibson followed . Then the storms came. The normal struggles that plague fighters began to pile up on George, however they were happening all at once. Two losses in a row set back his aspirations of UFC gold, but the injuries that followed threatened to end his career. A back injury and other assorted ailments left George’s fight career in limbo, however through the turmoil George found another passion; coaching.

George split with the former gym and created his own brand in California Mixed Martial Arts and Fitness. In a very short period of time the CMMA team has left an undeniable mark on the Southern California fight scene. The wins continued to pile up for the team, and although the head coach was proud of his new family, something was missing.

While getting the gym prepared and his injuries tended too, George soon found himself scratching at the old itch himself. A win over Sam Rodriguez on the regional scene primed George for his return to the national spotlight. He found that opportunity inside the Bellator MMA cage.

During the fight his opponent Mark Vorgeas attempted a guillotine choke however George deftly passed to side control where he applied what has become known as a ‘Von Flue’ choke. (A shoulder choke, that is named after Jason Von Flue who used the technique often with success!) George, an accomplished grappler knew his opponent was in a precarious situation and could tell by his disrupted breathing that the end was imminent.

As Vorgeas drifted into a state of unconsciousness a rather bizarre discussion ensued. “He’s out!”, George stated as he postured up, ready to drop hammers that remained holstered. ‘No he’s not!’ the referee blindly countered. After a few weird moments the referee looked in and finally agreed waiving off the fight.

The win and perhaps the bizarre circumstances behind the victory again thrust George into the spotlight. This time not as young gun with pink hair, but as a seasoned veteran and a true ambassador for the sport. Normally fighters are taught to wait for the referee to pull them off before relenting their attack. Had George acted like most, the whole sport itself would have been colored with the barbaric brush once again.

Although his recent win for Bellator MMA grabbed them a ton of notoriety (which they most definitely exploited), for some reason they have yet to book him another fight. In George it appears they could have what the UFC lacks, a marketable 135lbs fighter that could translate to the masses outside of the cage.

Instead it appears Bellator would prefer to promote aging legends and ‘never have beens’ whose only relevance is in projected ratings on a piece of paper. However one thing is certain in the MMA world one man gathers what another man spills, and its only a matter of time before the UFC realize the earning potential a fighter like George can bring.